GLOSSARY

Dry Port

A dry port (sometimes inland port) is an inland intermodal terminal directly connected by road or rail to a seaport and operating as a centre for the transshipment of sea cargo to inland destinations. In addition to their role in cargo transshipment, dry ports may also include facilities for storage and consolidation of goods, maintenance for road or rail cargo carriers and Customs clearance services. The location of these facilities at a dry port relieves competition for storage and Customs space at the seaport itself.

What is Dry Port?

A dry port (sometimes inland port) is an inland intermodal terminal directly connected by road or rail to a seaport and operating as a centre for the transshipment of sea cargo to inland destinations. In addition to their role in cargo transshipment, dry ports may also include facilities for storage and consolidation of goods, maintenance for road or rail cargo carriers and Customs clearance services. The location of these facilities at a dry port relieves competition for storage and Customs space at the seaport itself.

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Key takeaways:

One of the benefits of having dry ports is their ability to relieve the issues of storage and customs space that frequently plagues seaports.

Another benefit is the ability of a dry port to speed up the movement of cargo between ships and inland transportation systems that distribute the goods.

Dry ports are specialized facilities that are designed to process standardized shipping containers used within international transport.

Dry ports also act as a cost-effective distribution channel between seaports and high-capacity rail.

There is even an environmental benefit to using dry ports.

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The difference between seaport and dry port:

A dry port is a port that is away from the sea. It is more inland and connected to a seaport with either a paved road or railway. Dry ports are terminals where cargo brought over on ships is transshipped.

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Notes:

In addition to their role in cargo transshipment, dry ports may also include facilities for storage and consolidation of goods, maintenance for road or rail cargo carriers and customs clearance services. The location of these facilities at a dry port relieves competition for storage and customs space at the seaport itself.

A dry inland port can speed up the flow of cargo between ships and major land transportation networks, creating a more central distribution point. Inland ports can improve the movement of imports and exports, moving the time-consuming sorting and processing of containers inland, away from congested seaports.

Inland ports may also be referred to as dry ports or intermodal hubs.

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