GLOSSARY

Feeder Port

A feeder port is a port where the large ocean vessels normally don’t go. Partly because there are not enough containers to load onto a large ocean vessel or because the port is not large enough to handle the large ocean vessels.

What is Feeder Port?

A feeder port is a port where the large ocean vessels normally don’t go. Partly because there are not enough containers to load onto a large ocean vessel or because the port is not large enough to handle the large ocean vessels.

-

Key takeaways:

When choosing feeder ports, there are many things to take into consideration.

One important factor to take into consideration is the location of the port. By choosing the feeder port closest to your cargo, you can save a lot of money.

-

Notes:

Feeder ports play an important role in the global container network.

The efficiency in ports, infrastructure, and road congestion surrounding the ports also have a large impact on trucking costs.

When a port has the status freeport, it means in praxis that the cargo discharged doesn’t need to be cleared by customs immediately after arriving at the port. Most countries have local laws, which require that you must pay taxes for the cargo you have imported.

The taxes charged can differ depending on type and the origin of the cargo. Importing cargo via a freeport doesn’t mean you don’t have to pay taxes for your cargo.

Learn More

Related Articles:

Related Terms:

Main Port Dry Port Inland Port